free web tracker

The Meaning Of Video Games


Author : Steven E. Jones
language : en
Publisher: Routledge
Release Date : 2008-04-11


PDF Download The Meaning Of Video Games Books For free written by Steven E. Jones and has been published by Routledge this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2008-04-11 with Social Science categories.


The Meaning of Video Games takes a textual studies approach to an increasingly important form of expression in today’s culture. It begins by assuming that video games are meaningful–not just as sociological or economic or cultural evidence, but in their own right, as cultural expressions worthy of scholarly attention. In this way, this book makes a contribution to the study of video games, but it also aims to enrich textual studies. Early video game studies scholars were quick to point out that a game should never be reduced to merely its "story" or narrative content and they rightly insist on the importance of studying games as games. But here Steven E. Jones demonstrates that textual studies–which grows historically out of ancient questions of textual recension, multiple versions, production, reproduction, and reception–can fruitfully be applied to the study of video games. Citing specific examples such as Myst and Lost, Katamari Damacy, Halo, Façade, Nintendo’s Wii, and Will Wright’s Spore, the book explores the ways in which textual studies concepts–authorial intention, textual variability and performance, the paratext, publishing history and the social text–can shed light on video games as more than formal systems. It treats video games as cultural forms of expression that are received as they are played, out in the world, where their meanings get made.

Well Played 3 0


Author : Et Al
language : en
Publisher: Lulu.com
Release Date : 2011-07


PDF Download Well Played 3 0 Books For free written by Et Al and has been published by Lulu.com this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2011-07 with Education categories.


Following on Well Played 1.0 and 2.0, this book will also be full of in-depth close readings of video games that parse out the various meanings to be found in the experience of playing a game. Contributors will analyze sequences in a game in detail in order to illustrate and interpret how the various components of a game can come together to create fulfilling a playing experience unique to this medium. Contributors will again be looking at video games, some that were covered in Well Played 1.0 and 2.0 as well as new ones, in order to provide a variety of perspectives on more great games.

Philosophy Through Video Games


Author : Jon Cogburn
language : en
Publisher: Routledge
Release Date : 2009-09-10


PDF Download Philosophy Through Video Games Books For free written by Jon Cogburn and has been published by Routledge this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2009-09-10 with Games categories.


How can Wii Sports teach us about metaphysics? Can playing World of Warcraft lead to greater self-consciousness? How can we learn about aesthetics, ethics and divine attributes from Zork, Grand Theft Auto, and Civilization? A variety of increasingly sophisticated video games are rapidly overtaking books, films, and television as America's most popular form of media entertainment. It is estimated that by 2011 over 30 percent of US households will own a Wii console - about the same percentage that owned a television in 1953. In Philosophy Through Video Games, Jon Cogburn and Mark Silcox - philosophers with game industry experience - investigate the aesthetic appeal of video games, their effect on our morals, the insights they give us into our understanding of perceptual knowledge, personal identity, artificial intelligence, and the very meaning of life itself, arguing that video games are popular precisely because they engage with longstanding philosophical problems. Topics covered include: * The Problem of the External World * Dualism and Personal Identity * Artificial and Human Intelligence in the Philosophy of Mind * The Idea of Interactive Art * The Moral Effects of Video Games * Games and God's Goodness Games discussed include: Madden Football, Wii Sports, Guitar Hero, World of Warcraft, Sims Online, Second Life, Baldur's Gate, Knights of the Old Republic, Elder Scrolls, Zork, EverQuest Doom, Halo 2, Grand Theft Auto, Civilization, Mortal Kombat, Rome: Total War, Black and White, Aidyn Chronicles

Gaming For Meaning


Author :
language : en
Publisher:
Release Date : 2017


PDF Download Gaming For Meaning Books For free written by and has been published by this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2017 with Reader-response criticism categories.


"Video games and their communities have something to teach reader response theorists. These theories already recognize readers as creators by acknowledging that their interpretations make meaning; however, these theorists are still struggling to determine the limits of reader interpretation. Norman Holland fears that without text-based constraints on interpretation, differently-reading readers are isolated from each other. Stanley Fish, who sees value in conflicting reader interpretations, limits his examination only to insular scholarly communities. David Bleich observes that students make different meanings out of texts than their teachers, but does not discuss other communal interpretations occurring in the world beyond the classroom. In order to demonstrate that video games could advance these theories, this thesis examines, among other games, The Stanley Parable, which accepts differing player responses into the story while still employing powerful constraints through its code and narrator. It also is an example of the gaming community's experiments with constraints, as it was made by a player who changed existing game code. I argue that each of these theorists would benefit from immersion in video games as unique narratives that accept a tremendous variety of player responses, making them visible, recordable, and directly transferrable into the story. Players, as members of a community, also deserve notice from reader response scholars, as they have been discussing narrative critically with little academic recognition, and are experimenting with modifying game codes, stretching the limits of textual constraints in order to make even more interpretations possible.."--Abstract.

Mazes In Videogames


Author : Alison Gazzard
language : en
Publisher: McFarland
Release Date : 2013-04-17


PDF Download Mazes In Videogames Books For free written by Alison Gazzard and has been published by McFarland this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2013-04-17 with Games categories.


From the text adventures of Zork, to the arcade game of Pac-Man, to the corridors of Doom, and on to the city streets of Grand Theft Auto IV, the maze has often been used as a space to trap and confuse players in their navigation of gameworlds. However, the maze as a construction on the landscape has a long history before the invention of the videogame. By examining the change in the maze from the landscapes of open spaces and closed gardens through to the screen of the videogame, both mazes and labyrinths are discussed in terms of historical reference, alongside the author's personal experiences of walking and playing these structures. This book shows how our cultural experiences of real world maze landscapes may have changed, and how we negotiate videogame worlds along the various paths and meanings they so often create for us.

The Game Culture Reader


Author : Jason Thompson
language : en
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Release Date : 2014-07-18


PDF Download The Game Culture Reader Books For free written by Jason Thompson and has been published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2014-07-18 with Social Science categories.


In The Game Culture Reader, editors Jason C. Thompson and Marc A. Ouellette propose that Game Studies—that peculiar multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary field wherein international researchers from such diverse areas as rhetoric, computer science, literary studies, culture studies, psychology, media studies and so on come together to study the production, distribution, and consumption of games—has reached an unproductive stasis. Its scholarship remains either divided (as in the narratologists versus ludologists debate) or indecisive (as in its frequently apolitical stances on play and fandom). Thompson and Ouellette firmly hold that scholarship should be distinguished from the repetitively reductive commonplaces of violence, sexism, and addiction. In other words, beyond the headline-friendly modern topoi that now dominate the discourse of Game Studies, what issues, approaches, and insights are being, if not erased, then displaced? This volume gathers together a host of scholars from different countries, institutions, disciplines, departments, and ranks, in order to present original and evocative scholarship on digital game culture. Collectively, the contributors reject the commonplaces that have come to define digital games as apolitical or as somehow outside of the imbricated processes of cultural production that govern the medium itself. As an alternative, they offer essays that explore video game theory, ludic spaces and temporalities, and video game rhetorics. Importantly, the authors emphasize throughout that digital games should be understood on their own terms: literally, this assertion necessitates the serious reconsideration of terms borrowed from other academic disciplines; figuratively, the claim embeds the embrace of game play in the continuing investigation of digital games as cultural forms. Put another way, by questioning the received wisdom that would consign digital games to irrelevant spheres of harmless child’s play or of invidious mass entertainment, the authors productively engage with ludic ambiguities.

A Multimodal Approach To Video Games And The Player Experience


Author : Weimin Toh
language : en
Publisher: Routledge
Release Date : 2018-10-25


PDF Download A Multimodal Approach To Video Games And The Player Experience Books For free written by Weimin Toh and has been published by Routledge this book supported file pdf, txt, epub, kindle and other format this book has been release on 2018-10-25 with Language Arts & Disciplines categories.


This volume puts forth an original theoretical framework, the ludonarrative model, for studying video games which foregrounds the empirical study of the player experience. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to and description of the model, which draws on theoretical frameworks from multimodal discourse analysis, game studies, and social semiotics, and its development out of participant observation and qualitative interviews from the empirical study of a group of players. The volume then applies this approach to shed light on how players’ experiences in a game influence how they understand and make use of game components in order to progress its narrative. The book concludes with a frame by frame analysis of a popular game to demonstrate the model’s principles in action and its subsequent broader applicability to analyzing video game interaction and design. Offering a new way forward for video game research, this volume is key reading for students and scholars in multimodality, discourse analysis, game studies, interactive storytelling, and new media.